Irish Film Festivals

Irish Film Festivals

To start the new year off with a bang, here’s a list of Irish, and Irish-themed, film festivals that—although they’re not this one—still have their merits.  Some are more focused on shorts than others (ADIFF, for example is more of a feature film festival, so sending something independent in on spec is taking a big chance). Some are also more focused on documentaries or animation, or have themes that may not be appropriate for your own work.  Finally, remember to be kind to your wallet and keep an eye out for Early Bird deadlines.

 

Belfast Film Festival
https://belfastfilmfestival.org/

Capital Irish Film Festival (Solas Nua)
http://www.solasnua.org/ciff/

Charlie Chaplin Comedy Film Festival
http://chaplinfilmfestival.com/how-to-enter

Chicago Irish Film Festival
http://www.chicagoirishfilmfestival.com/

Clones Film Festival
https://www.clonesfilmfestival.com/

Cork
http://corkfilmfest.org/

Darklight Festival
http://www.darklight.ie/

Dingle Film Festival
http://www.dinglefilmfestival.com/

Dublin International Film Festival
http://www.diff.ie/

Dublin Animation Film Festival
http://www.dublinanimationfilmfestival.com/

Dublin Web Fest
http://dublinwebfest.com/

Fastnet Film Festival
http://www.fastnetfilmfestival.com/

Feminist Film Festival
http://feministfilmfestivaldublin.com/

Fingal Film Festival
http://www.fingalfilmfest.com/

Fresh Film Festival
http://freshfilmfestival.net/

Foyle Film Festival
http://www.foylefilmfestival.org/

Galway Film Fleadh
http://www.galwayfilmfleadh.com/

GAZE
http://www.gaze.ie/

Guth Gafa
http://guthgafa.com/

IFI Festivals
http://ifi.ie/whatson/festivals/

IndieCork
http://indiecork.com/

Kerry Film Festival
http://www.kerryfilmfestival.com/

Limerick Film Festival
https://limerickfilmfestival.net/

London Irish Film Festival
http://www.irishfilmfestivallondon.com/

OFFLine Film Festival
http://www.offlinefilmfestival.com/

The Richard Harris International Film Festival
http://richardharrisfilmfestival.com/

San Francisco Irish Film Festival
http://sfirishfilm.com/

Shebeen Flick
http://www.shebeenflick.com/

Silk Road Film Festival
http://silkroadfilmfestival.com/

Stranger Than Fiction
http://stfdocs.com/

Underground Cinema
http://www.ucff.ie/

Waterford Film Festival
http://www.waterfordfilmfestival.net/

Dublin International Short Film and Music Festival
http://disfmf.ie/

PS If there’s any we missed, please feel free to add them in the comments.

Written By Tim Hanan

DISFMF 2016 Winners

DISFMF 2016 Winners

Winners 2016

 

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Best Director, Gui Campos, Rosinha, Brazil
Best Producer, Savio Sequeira & Anthony Renwick Mc Gill, The Job Paradox, Ireland
Best Script, Maurice O’Connel, Proclaim, Ireland
Best Music Video, Veto By Son Directed by Abderrezak Chriette, Germany
Best Cinematography, Sam Heasman, Miracle On Canary Wharf, Directed by Bradley Porter, UK
Best Edit, Gurmmeet Singh, All I Want, Directed by Venika Mitra, India
Best Animation, Little Flower, Directed by Brigette Heffernan, Ireland
Best Sound Design, Livia Rusic & Keith Thomas, Silence, Directed by Dejan Mrkic, Australia
Best Student Short, Ella, Directed by Damian Madden , Ireland
Best Music/Score, Martina Walker, Elga Fox, Melanie Hoskin, Staged, Directed by Sonya Mulligan and Rachel Gregan/ Ireland
Best Actor, Graham Earley, Numb, Directed by Dara McConnell, Ireland
Best Actress, Olga Skvortsova, Call It As You Wish, Directed by Kiryl Halitsky, Belarus
Best Documentary, Code Therapy, Directed by Divya Pathak, UK
Best Irish Short, Leave, Directed by Mike Hayes

Short Films Programme 2016

Short Films Programme 2016

Programme 1, Thursday 6th October, Cineworld 12:00pm

Proclaim!, Directed by Maureen O’Connell, 20min, Ireland 2016, Drama History
Silence, Directed by Dejan Mrkic, 15min, UK and Australia 2016, Drama
Tunisia 2045, Directed by Ted Hardy-Carnac, 4min, France 2016, Science Fiction
Solid, Directed by Patrick O’Shea, 16min, Ireland 2016, Crime-Drama
Rosinha, Directed by Gui Campos, 14min, Brazil 2016, Drama
Miracle on Canary Wharf, Directed by Bradley Porter, 8min, United Kingdom 2016, Drama
Slices, Directed by James Murray, 13min, Ireland 2016, Comedy

Programme 2, Thursday 6th October, Cineworld 14:00pm

Space & Time, Directed by Camps Aureliane, 16min, France 2015, Fiction
Recycled Equestrian, Directed by Jessica Lamb, 8min, Ireland 2016, Documentary
Midnight of my Life, Directed by Phil Davis, 8min, United Kingdom 2016, Comedy-Drama
A Beautiful Death, Directed by Patrick McDermott, 8min, Ireland 2015, Drama
Son, Directed by Cyrus Neshvad, 14min, Luxembourg 2016, Drama
Fuller Democracy, Directed by Jonathan Victory, 13min, Ireland 2016, Documentary
The First Ride, Directed by Stephanos Melikidis, 2min, Cyprus 2016, Advert
The Spark, Directed by Alan Buckley, 19min, Ireland 2016, Romantic Comedy
Misty Mid – Lina Button, Directed by Flavio Gerber, 4min, Switzerland 2015, Music Video

Programme 3, Thursday 6th October, Cineworld 16:00pm

Babe, I fucked Bunbury, Directed by Teresa Bellon and Cesar F Calvillo, 3min, Spain 2016, Comedy
Miah, Directed by Daniel Corcoran, 17min, Ireland 2016, Drama
The Confession, Directed by John La Raw, 20min, South Korea 2015, Drama
In The Valley of the Moon, Directed by Brian Rossney, 14min, Ireland 2015, Drama
The Land of Exodus, Directed by Skinner Myers, 11min, United States 2015, Drama
Date Night, Directed by Ross Carey, 12min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Limoncello, Directed by Alessandro Dioguardi, 13min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Numb, Directed by Dara McConnell, 15min, Ireland 2016, Thriller
Notorious Corn, Directed by Mallory Grolleau, 1 min, France 2015, Animation
Tiger Tiger, Directed by Donnagh FitzPatrick, 12min, Ireland 2015, Drama

Programme 4, Friday 7th October, Cineworld 12:00am

Competition, Directed by Artur Boruzs, 7min, Romania 2015, Drama
Nymphet, Directed by Laura Hermanides, 12min, Belgium-Ireland 2016, Drama
3xLOVE, Directed by Olga Chajdas,, 17min, Poland 2016, Experimental-Drama
Nach Spiel (Aftermath), Directed by Ralf Beyerle, 10min, Germany 2016, Comedy Drama
Just Like a Mother, Directed by Lauren Fee, 11min, Ireland 2016, Documentary
The Blow-In, Directed by Teresa O’Brien, 8min, Ireland 2015, Documentary
Jacked, Directed by Rene Pannevis, 15min, United Kingdom 2015, Drama-Crime
Bio, Directed by William Morgan, 10min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Programme 5,Friday 7th October, Cineworld 14:00pm

Gone Viral, Directed by Charlo Johnson, 7min, Ireland 2016, Comedy
A House Downstairs, Directed by Emily Murray, 4min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Date:Time, Directed by Paul Corey, 15min, Ireland 2016, Drama-Romance
The Observation Level, Directed by Aidan Duffy, 5min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Happy Tuesday, Directed by Wouter van Couwelaar, 19min, Netherlands 2016, Drama
My Mother Once Told Me, Directed by Phil Davin, 7min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Enclave, Directed by Martin Curley and Lauren Shannon-James, 13min, Ireland 2015, Drama-SF
Proposal, Directed by Abraham Tarrush, 6min, Ireland 2016, Drama-Comedy
Dead Sharks, Directed by Nik Barker, 16min, Australia 2015, Drama

Programme 6, Friday 7th of October, Cineworld 16:00pm

The Closet, Directed by Patrick McKnight, 20min, Ireland 2016,
Comedy-Drama
Egreto, Directed by Dimitrios Maggioros, 13min, Greece 2016, Drama
More Than A Barber Shop, Directed by Xandru Fernandez and Fernando Otero, 19min, Ireland 2016, Documentary
Time, Directed by Tim Hanan, 2min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Thorn, Directed by David Scott, 5min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Drop the Hand, Directed by Simon O’Neill, 23min, Ireland 2016, Comedy-Drama
Ergo, Directed by Alice Sephton, 5min, United Kingdom 2016, Drama
F430, Directed by Yassine Qnia, 22min, France 2015, Drama
RCP 5, Directed by Garry Miley, 12min, Ireland 2015, Drama
One Minute of Silence, Directed by Guillaume Renusson, 1min, France 2013, Drama

Programme 7, Saturday 8th October, Cineworld 12:00pm

Istoria Lumina, Directed by Francois Barbier, 10 min, Romania 2016, Drama
The Apparel, Directed by Peter Delaney, 16min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Leave, Directed by Mike Hayes, 15min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Wifey Redux, Directed by Robert McKeon, 22min, Ireland 2016, Comedy-Drama
Ella, Directed by Damien Madden, 8min, Ireland 2015, Documentary
Little Flower, Directed by Brigette Heffernan, 3min, Ireland 2016, Animation
Torsion, Directed by Garrett Lynam, 5min, Ireland 2016, Drama
The Perfect Kiss, Directed by Garrett Lynam, 11min, Ireland 2016, Comedy

Programme 8, Saturday 8th October, Cineworld 14:00pm

Call It as You Wish, Directed by Kiryl Halitsky, 30min, Belarus 2016, Drama
Reverie, Directed by Peter James Melrose, 14min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Staged, Directed by Sonya Mulligan and Rachel Gregan, 19min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Summon Her Children, Directed by Wesley O’Duinn, 25min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Believe It or Not, Directed by Carl Murphy, 6min, Ireland 2016, Comedy-Thriller

Programme 9, Saturday 8th October, Cineworld 16:00pm

Lhari, Directed by Robert Hloz, 27min, Czech Republic 2015, Dark Comedy, Drama
The Presence, Directed by Declan Loftus, 15min, Ireland 2015, Drama
Age of Unreason, Directed by Christophe Louis, 19min, France 2015, Drama
Look Closer, Directed by Aleksander Szeser, 15min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Redo, Directed by Gine Therese Grønner, 15min, Norway 2016, Drama

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Programme 10, Sunday 9th October, Sugar Club 14:00pm

Save, Directed by Ivan Sainz-Pardo, 4min, Spain and Germany 2016, Thriller
Moose, Directed by Arka Das, 10min, Australia 2015, Dark Comedy
Minh Tam, Directed by Vincent Maury, 24min, France 2016, Drama-Human Rights
Luz, Directed by Lena Weiss, 15min, Austria 2016, Documentary
Family Bonds, Directed by Takashi Yamamoto, 19min, Japan 2015, Family Drama
Blodimery, Directed by Francisco Denis, 10min, Venezuela 2016, Comedy Film Noir
Rum, Directed by Russell Haigh, 4min, United Kingdom 2016, Animation

Programme 11, Sunday 9th October, Sugar Club 16:00

Bank Robber’s Serenade, Directed by Guillaume De Ginestel, 23min, France 2015, Comedy-Crime
All I Want, Directed by Venika Mitra, 7min, India 2016, Drama
Music Video Project:Veto by Sohn, Directed by Abderrezak Chriette, 5min, Germany 2015, Music Video
Contact, Directed by Stephen Brady, 15min, Ireland 2015, Drama
Drifting, Directed by Alexander Kuribayashi, 2min, Ireland 2016, Music Video
Robot Koch & Delhia de France – ‘Dark Waves’, Directed By Sven D., 4min, United States 2015, Music Video
Circles, Directed by Dean Puckett, 15min, United Kingdom 2015, Comedy Horror
Code Therapy, Directed by Divya Pathak,15min, United Kingdom 2016, Documentary

Programme 12, Sunday 9th October, Sugar Club 18:00

Wait, Directed by Audrey O’Reilly, 12min, Ireland 2015, Drama
The Job Paradox, Directed by Savio Sequeira, 29min, Ireland 2016, Drama
Hand in Hand, Directed by Sarah Dempsey, 10min, Ireland 2015, Documentary
We’ve Got Wings, Directed by Roxana Vilk, 4min, United Kingdom 20165, Music Video
Latchkey Kids, Directed by Elad Goldman, 22min, Israel 2015, Drama
Children’s Allowance, Directed by Brian Stynes, 8min, Ireland 2015, Drama
The Monster, Directed by Bob Pipe, 16min, United Kingdom 2015, Comedy-Horror

20:00pm The Awards Ceremony at The Sugar Club

Short Films Selection 2016

Short Films Selection 2016

Here is the short film selection for 2016, a programme will be up by the end of the week. Congratulation to all the selected.

LAUREAT-SILVER-2016

Nach Spiel (Aftermath), Directed by Ralf Beyerle, 10min, Germany 2016, Comedy Drama

Space & Time, Directed by Camps Aureliane, 16min, France 2015, Fiction

Babe, I fucked Bunbury, Directed by Teresa Bellon and Cesar F Calvillo, 3min, Spain 2016, Comedy

Save, Directed by Ivan Sainz-Pardo, 4min, Spain and Germany 2016, Thriller

Miah, Directed by Daniel Corcoran, 17min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Recycled Equestrian, Directed by Jessica Lamb, 8min, Ireland 2016, Documentary

Lhari, Directed by Robert Hloz, 27min, Czech Republic 2015, Dark Comedy, Drama

Moose, Directed by Arka Das, 10min, Australia 2015, Dark Comedy

In The Valley of the Moon, Directed by Brian Rossney, 14min, Ireland 2015, Drama

One Minute of Silence, Directed by Guillaume Renusson, 1min, France 2013, Drama

The Confession, Directed by John La Raw, 20min, South Korea 2015, Drama

Just Like a Mother, Directed by Lauren Fee, 11min, Ireland 2016, Documentary

Solid, Directed by Patrick O’Shea, 16min, Ireland 2016, Crime-Drama

Minh Tam, Directed by Vincent Maury, 24min, France 2016, Drama-Human Rights

Rosinha, Directed by Gui Campos, 14min, Brazil 2016, Drama

Midnight of my Life, Directed by Phil Davis, 8min, United Kingdom 2016, Comedy-Drama

F430, Directed by Yassine Qnia, 22min, France 2015, Drama

Jacked, Directed by Rene Pannevis, 15min, United Kingdom 2015, Drama-Crime

The Blow-In, Directed by Teresa O’Brien, 8min, Ireland 2015, Documentary

The Land of Exodus, Directed by Skinner Myers, 11min, United States 2015, Drama

Luz, Directed by Lena Weiss, 15min, Austria 2016, Documentary

Blodimery, Directed by Francisco Denis, 10min, Venezuela 2016, Comedy Film Noir

A Beautiful Death, Directed by Patrick McDermott, 8min, Ireland 2015, Drama

Ergo, Directed by Alice Sephton, 5min, United Kingdom 2016, Drama

Children’s Allowance, Directed by Brian Stynes, 8min, Ireland 2015, Drama

Rum, Directed by Russell Haigh, 4min, United Kingdom 2016, Animation

Bank Robber’s Serenade, Directed By Guillaume De Ginestel, 23min, France 2015, Comedy-Crime

Son, Directed by Cyrus Neshvad, 14min, Luxembourg 2016, Drama

All I Want, Directed by Venika Mitra, 7min, India 2016, Drama

Music Video Project:Veto by Sohn, Directed by Abderrezak Chriette, 5min, Germany 2015, Music Video

Silence, Directed by Dejan Mrkic, 15min, UK and Australia 2016, Drama

Date Night, Directed by Ross Carey, 12min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Summon Her Children, Directed by Wesley O’Duinn, 25min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Staged, Directed by Sonya Mulligan and Rachel Gregan, 19min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Tunisia 2045, Directed by Ted Hardy-Carnac, 4min, France 2016, Science Fiction

Proclaim!, Directed by Maureen O’Connell, 20min, Ireland 2016, Drama History

Proposal, Directed by Abraham Tarrush, 6min, Ireland 2016, Drama-Comedy

Fuller Democracy, Directed by Jonathan Victory, 13min, Ireland 2016, Documentary

Call It As You Wish, Directed by Kiryl Halitsky, 30min, Belarus 2016, Drama

Contact, Directed by Stephen Brady, 15min, Ireland 2015, Drama

Drop the Hand, Directed by Simon O’Neill, 23min, Ireland 2016, Comedy-Drama

The Job Paradox, Directed by Savio Sequeira, 29min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Believe It Or Not, Directed by Carl Murphy, 6min, Ireland 2016, Comedy-Thriller

The First Ride, Directed by Stephanos Melikidis, 2min, Cyprus 2016, Advert

Limoncello, Directed by Alessandro Dioguardi, 13min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Drifting, Directed by Alexander Kuribayashi, 2min, Ireland 2016, Music Video

Enclave, Directed by Martin Curley and Lauren Shannon-James, 13min, Ireland 2015, Drama-SF

A House Downstairs, Directed by Emily Murray, 4min, Ireland 2016, Drama

The Closet, Directed by Patrick McKnight, 20min, Ireland 2016,
Comedy-Drama

Date:Time, Directed by Paul Corey, 15min, Ireland 2016, Drama-Romance

The Observation Level, Directed by Aidan Duffy, 5min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Miracle on Canary Wharf, Directed by Bradley Porter, 8min, United Kingdom 2016, Drama

Notorious Corn, Directed by Mallory Grolleau, 1 min, France 2015, Animation

Ella, Directed by Damien Madden, 8min, Ireland 2015, Documentary

My Mother Once Told Me, Directed by Phil Davin, 7min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Leave, Directed by Mike Hayes, 15min, Ireland 2016, Drama

The Apparel, Directed by Peter Delaney, 16min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Happy Tuesday, Directed by Wouter van Couwelaar, 19min, Netherlands 2016, Drama

Time, Directed by Tim Hanan, 2min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Egreto, Directed by Dimitrios Maggioros, 13min, Greece 2016, Drama

Dead Sharks, Directed by Nik Barker, 16min, Australia 2015, Drama

More Than A Barber Shop, Directed by Xandru Fernandez Ramirez and Fernando Otero, 19min, Ireland 2016, Documentary

Latchkey Kids, Directed by Elad Goldman, 22min, Israel 2015, Drama

Bio, Directed by William Morgan, 10min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Gone Viral, Directed by Charlo Johnson, 7min, Ireland 2016, Comedy

Robot Koch & Delhia de France – ‘Dark Waves’, Directed By Sven D., 4min, United States 2015, Music Video

Competition, Directed by Artur Boruzs, 7min, Romania 2015, Drama

Circles, Directed by Dean Puckett, 15min, United Kingdom 2015, Comedy Horror

Slices, Directed by James Murray, 13min, Ireland 2016, Comedy

Code Therapy, Directed by Divya Pathak,15min, United Kingdom 2016, Documentary

Thorn, Directed by David Scott, 5min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Age of Unreason, Directed by Christophe Louis, 19min, France 2015, Drama

Reverie, Directed by Peter James Melrose, 14min, Ireland 2016, Drama

The Spark, Directed by Alan Buckley, 19min, Ireland 2016, Romantic Comedy

Istoria Lumina, Directed by Francois Barbier, 10 min, Romania 2016, Drama

Little Flower, Directed by Brigette Heffernan, 3min, Ireland 2016, Animation

RCP 5, Directed by Garry Miley, 12min, Ireland 2015, Drama

Torsion, Directed by Garrett Lynam, 5min, Ireland 2016, Drama

Wait, Directed by Audrey O’Reilly, 12min, Ireland 2015, Drama

The Perfect Kiss, Directed by Garrett Lynam, 11min, Ireland 2016, Comedy

Numb, Directed by Dara McConnell, 15min, Ireland 2016, Thriller

Nymphet, Directed by Laura Hermanides, 12min, Belgium-Ireland 2016, Drama

The Presence, Directed by Declan Loftus, 15min, Ireland 2015, Drama

3xLOVE, Directed by Olga Chajdas,, 17min, Poland 2016, Experimental-Drama

Tiger Tiger, Directed by Donnagh FitzPatrick, 12min, Ireland 2015, Drama

Misty Mid – Lina Button, Directed by Flavio Gerber, 4min, Switzerland 2015, Music Video

Look Closer, Directed by Aleksander Szeser, 15min, Ireland 2016, Drama

The Monster, Directed by Bob Pipe, 16min, United Kingdom 2015, Comedy-Horror

Hand in Hand, Directed by Sarah Dempsey, 10min, Ireland 2015, Documentary

Family Bonds, Directed by Takashi Yamamoto, 19min, Japan 2015, Family Drama

We’ve Got Wings, Directed by Roxana Vilk, 4min, United Kingdom 20165, Music Video

Wifey Redux, Directed by Robert McKeon, 22min, Ireland 2016, Comedy-Drama

Redo, Directed by Gine Therese Grønner, 15min, Norway 2016, Drama

Maggie’s Plan

Maggie’s Plan

Directed by Rebecca Miller and released in Ireland on 8th July 2016, Maggie’s Plan raises the question as to whether the need to control others is an individual personality trait or an encompassing human one. The off kilter comedy set in New York is often sobering alongside the sun spots, with absorbing performances from Greta Gerwig, Ethan Hawke, Bill Hader and Julianne Moore. The audience’s established affection for Gerwig following her performance in Frances Ha (2013) is supported by a voyeuristic commentary on the contemporary human experience. The portrayal of idealized adulthood plans gone awry is familiar, made distinctive through Maggie’s misguided attempt to face ‘the truth about herself’ through fervent micromanagement of her familiar’s social choreography.
In a whistle-stop opening we are introduced to her original plan whereby Maggie is determined to have a baby, aided by way of a friendly donation from Guy the ‘Pickle Entrepreneur’; a character whose only real flaw is a complete misinterpretation of personal space. However the carefully planned procedure is interrupted by brash proclamations of love, rewriting Maggie’s need to make external human relationships ordered through planning. Almost immediately an ill-advised and impulsive extramarital love affair springs between Maggie and John, one of the bad boys from ficto-critical anthropology, as portrayed by Ethan Hawke. Miller then opts to fast-forward through the rose-tinted honeymoon period that follows, with the narrative resettling three years later. The couple have established a semi-idealistic albeit mildly delusional situation, largely as a result of the classic inclination to demonize all that threatened their union. In quickly seeking a liberal partnership they leap beyond all social preliminaries and end up far from either of their real dreams, and even farther from admitting it. Just as Maggie had been courted by the chapters of John’s never-ending and far from realized great novel, the novelty of their fresh affections are quenched by unappealing reality. Far too soon are the couple trapped in the mundane tide and must face the notion that love doesn’t work that way “you can’t take everything and stuff it back in the box”.

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From over-emotional preliminaries and the backing track of John’s second marriage quietly crumbling, Maggie is compelled to launch a new phase of her plan in order to achieve her contradictory ideals and ‘live truthfully’. Just as Maggie had described John’s novel as screwball surreal, the account becomes increasingly apt for the film itself. The very dynamic she sought to liberate John from in his first marriage now appears to be exactly what is prescribed for their own union, verifying the cliché that every relationship has a rose and a gardener. For a time it seems as if there is no happy ending in sight, with a cosy lifestyle gone lukewarm, a suggested repercussion of wise advice once ignored.
Thankfully this is not the case and a new plot, inspired by a joke, sees Maggie team up with John’s eccentric ex-wife played by Julianne Moore. A combined effort is required as Maggie and Georgette’s covert scheme seeks to readjust John’s affections. Meanwhile he remains oblivious and merely flirts with reality through his writing, adjusting his character portrayals as needed in order to reaffirm his choices. However every scheme exists to be unfurled, and with realization of Maggie’s need to dictate reality comes a dial-down of vibrancy. Once paired with academic idiom that references commodity fetishism, Miller’s film serves as a larger commentary on the fetishization of grand romantic gestures as generic solutions. Throughout the bumbling yet charming plot the audience comes to recognize that true affection is often miraculously ill-timed, and possibly always spurred on by hot whiskeys and classic Bruce Springsteen. Maggie’s Plan portrays collective contemporary frustration at the individual’s inability to create things in their own vision, incorporating notions of overwhelming self-interest alongside a suggestion that lovers of math are drawn to those who are calculating. Overall it makes space for progressive partnerships that can ultimately succeed, leaving room for the naked portrayal of the flawed character with good intentions.

By Jessica Mc Kinney

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Fragmented Notions in ‘The Hopeless End of a Great Dream’

Fragmented Notions in ‘The Hopeless End of a Great Dream’

The Hopeless End of a Great Dream is the new 16mm film commissioned by Irish artist Declan Clarke and freshly exhibited at Temple Bar Gallery + Studios. The greatly anticipated project benefited from the support of Belfast Exposed, Centre Cultural Irlandais Paris and Trinity Creative, and was additionally backed by the Arts Council project award 2016. The feature previewed initially at the Edmund Burke Theatre in Trinity College Dublin on the 20th of April.

Declan Clarke, who was born in Dublin in 1974, conducted his studies at National College of Art and Design Dublin and Chelsea College of Arts in London.During his career Clarkehasincorporated a range of varying media in his art, however film retains an established presence within his excursions.Largely his work seeks to pepper instances of formative grand narratives with experiential snippets from everyday life.His contemporary work includes notable exhibitions in various spaces of Dublin, such as Wreckage in May last year at the Hugh Lane, and Group Portrait with Explosives at Mother’s Tankstation in 2014. Additionally his work, both collaborative and solo projects, has reached the far corners of the globe through galleries and film festivals in London, Leipzig, Berlin, Lisbon and New York.

Experiencing The Hopeless End of a Great Dream involves the movement from the bustling square of Temple Bar through to a subdued exhibition room lined with photographs. This further leads to the screening area where the same external activity is subsequently incorporated in the opening of the film. Notably the feature is shot exclusively on the grounds of the Trinity College. The traditional aesthetic of the architecture invokes a full bodied sense of importance regarding the significance of the past. Throughout the film is immersive whilst appealing to voyeuristic tendencies. There is a sense that the viewing of the incidents portrayed is accidental, like tuning in to a forgotten radio wave. The audience is privy to several paralleled threads which contribute to the curation of its fragmented nature, invoking some disorientation as it references instances from past history in Ireland. However due to the presentation of these extracts in their contemporary setting, the film succeeds in blurring aspects of past and present alongside reality and legend.

From the beginning the viewer is immersed in a series of empty spaces, a ream of controlled presences and reinforced quietude. These thematic choices parallel the nature of the viewing space itself. The character’s movements are reminiscent of a culturally inscribed social choreography, reinforcing the notion of catalytic events in Irish history. It is important to note the distinct lack of music in the film, meaning that the characters must carve out atmospheric presence for themselves. The shifting points of view in the feature are suggestive of varying degrees of interest, perhaps in the mysteries of this country’s past. Truly mystery is the objective as the viewer cannot help but seek connections between the several stories, constantly questioning what exactly this film is trying to communicate “If this is all starting to sound like something penned by Ian Fleming, that is no mistake”.

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The potency of the film is reinforced by its methodical approach, the crux of the feature is presented alluringly like a secret folded in and in on itself. Just as there is a precise significance to every image captured on the film, each object has a charged presence. One such weighty example of these charged objects are the photographs, which serve as prompts throughout and mirror those exhibited in the main hall of the gallery. To create substantial space for these indicted items the speech included in the feature is sporadic, imbibing that which is not being said with the most importance. Despite instances of silence, the information suggested is boundless. The audience is left feeling as if they had been pulled through history to confront contemporary Dublin, the notion is mirrored by the iconic closing sequence of one man pulling another through the halls of Trinity library.

In short the experience is fragmentary and provocative. Through to the prolonged shuffling of the concluding frames we are still curious as to whether we have understood all that was necessary from the viewing. Once faced with the credits the viewer must trust that they have absorbed the significant information. The lack of traditional closure heightens the clandestine notions shrouding aspects of Ireland’s past. The exhibition will continue until 18th June 2016, from there moving to spaces in Belfast and later Paris.

By Jessica Mc Kinney

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